Symposia

Information on Symposia Sessions

Symposia are available to registered Congress delegates and will be held on Sunday 4 December, Monday 5 December, and Tuesday 6 December. Minimum and maximum numbers apply to all symposia. Those symposia for which minimum numbers are not met may be cancelled and delegates will be notified via email. Symposia will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

 Sunday 4th December 1400 – 1545

Symposium 1 - Challenges to Human and Animal Health

Date: Sunday 4th December 2016
Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairpersons: Dr Eugene Athan (Barwon Health, Australia) and George Fu Gao (China Center for Disease Control, China)

Overview

This symposium is concerned with some of the challenges to human and animal health due to infectious diseases and the factors that predispose to their emergence and spread. Many emergent pathogens are not only linked to increasing contact between humans and animals, both domestic and wild, but also to intensification and integration of food production, to the need for clean drinking water, to climate, and to the expansion of international travel and trade. The role of the wildlife-livestock-human-ecosystem interfaces has been fundamental to the development of the One Health paradigm, a concept that recognizes that the health of humans, animals, and ecosystems are interconnected, and that to better understand and respond to zoonotic diseases requires coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral approaches. The world is facing some immediate and alarming threats at this point in time. Some are obvious, such as the enormous concern posed by antimicrobial resistance, especially the increasing rates of resistance and the lack of new antimicrobials on the horizon, but others are less well defined such as the next influenza pandemic – we know it will happen, just not when or which strain of virus – and the next new emergent to jump from obscurity to threaten the world. There are other concerns too which are just around the corner such as the health of our livestock – often crucial to economies in developing countries – and to the need to feed a hungry world and to provide potable water, and the many problems associated with climate change. The symposium will be directed towards discussing some of these challenges to our future.

Speakers

  • Prof Jonathan Patz (University of Wisconsin) – Climate Change and effects on human and animal diseases.
  • Dr Kurt Kuelke (Australian Animal Health Laboratory, CSIRO) – Presentation title to be announced
  • Prof Malik Peiris (University of Hong Kong) – Pandemic predictions – Can influenza pandemics ever be anticipated?
  • Dr Wanda Markotter – Challenges and Opportunities in Developing One Health Approaches to Studying Zoonotic Diseases – Experiences in South Africa
Symposium 2 - Non-communicable Diseases and the Energy-Rich Food System

Date: Sunday 4th December 2o16
Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairpersons: Dr Brigitte Bagnol (Wits University/ University of Sydney, Australia) and Dr Sinead Boylan (University of Sydney, Australia)

Overview

A brief overview will be available soon.

Speakers

  • Brad Ridoutt (CSIRO) – Overconsumption of energy and excessive discretionary food intake inflates dietary greenhouse gas emissions in Australia
  • Dr Josephine Gwynn (University of Sydney) – The Gap in Closing the Gap: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander food and nutrition – The consequences of invasion
  • Prof David Raubenheimer (University of Sydney) – Nutritional ecology and human health
  • Prof Anthony Capon (United Nations University) – NCD prevention strategies

Sunday 4th December 1615 – 1800

Symposium 3 - Novel Emergent Zoonoses

Date: Sunday 4th December 2016
Time: 1615 – 1800
Chairpersons: Prof. Soren Alexandersen, Deakin University

Overview and Speakers

Prof Gary Kobinger, Research Centre in Infectious Diseases, Canada
Field response to Ebola outbreaks influenced the development of vaccines and therapeutics

Prof Vincent Munster, Chief Virus Ecology Unit, USA
The ecology of MERS-CoV: from host reservoir to human disease 

Dr Debbie Eagles, CSIRO-AAHL
Henipavirus outbreak in the southern Philippines

Dr Bethany Hoye, Deakin University
High prevalance of Influenza A virus in an isolated island population reveals widespread viral reassortment in Australian wild birds. 

AProf Daniel O’Brien, Barwon Health
The state of play of the emergence and ecology of Mycobacteria ulcerans and the link to possums

Symposium 4 - Future Health

Date: Sunday 4th December
Time: 1615 – 1800
Chairpersons: Dr Christine Machalaba (EcoHealth Alliance)

Overview

Our future health faces unprecedented pressures under global change. A One Health/ EcoHealth approach can help improve understanding of the complex dynamics of human, animal and environmental dimensions in light of our changing ecosystems, as well as inform coordinated solutions. In 2015 the Future Earth global sustainability platform was formed to drive innovative science, policy and practice across different sectors. This symposium will introduce the goals of Future Earth, summarize the projected threats to health under global environmental change, propose potential solutions, and offer an opportunity for the One Health EcoHealth community to weigh into the formation of the health agenda under Future Earth.

Organizers: Peter Daszak and William B. Karesh

Hosted by: Future Health/oneHEALTH core project of Future Earth and EcoHealth Alliance

 

Introduction (16:15-16:25):

How Ecology and Human Behaviour Drive Emerging Diseases- Seeking Solutions
Peter Daszak

 

Panel Presentations (16:25-17:35):

Ecology and Health: What Drives Disease
Gerardo Suzan, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Diversifying Food and Diets: Using Biodiversity to Improve Global Nutrition
Danny Hunter, Bioversity International

Strategic foresight for Sustainable Agriculture for People, Animals and Environment
Peter Black, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN

Using Climate and Weather Data to Predict and Mitigate Disease
Assaf Anyamba, United Space Research Association/NASA

Disease Control: Benefits to Health, Development and Livelihoods
Subhash Morzaria, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN

Video Presentation by Sir Andy Haines, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

How One Health Can Help Promote Future Health
William B. Karesh, EcoHealth Alliance

Consultation Forum (17:35-18:00):

  • Research and policy priorities for the One Health/EcoHealth community
  • Means of engagement in Future Health

 Monday 5th December 1400 – 1545

Symposium 5 - PREDICT: A multi-country project seeking to understand novel diseases

Date: Monday 5th December 2016
Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairpersons: Prof Jonna Mazet (University of California Davis)

Overview

PREDICT, a project of USAID’s Emerging Pandemic Threats program, was initiated in 2009 to strengthen global capacity for detection and discovery of zoonotic viruses with pandemic potential. Using a One Health approach, PREDICT has made significant contributions to strengthening global surveillance and laboratory diagnostic capabilities for new and known viruses. Now working with partners in 31 countries, the PREDICT team is continuing to build platforms for disease surveillance and for identifying and monitoring pathogens that can be shared between animals and people. Team members and partners will discuss ongoing activities and investigations into the behaviors, practices, and ecological and biological factors driving disease emergence, transmission, and spread. Through these efforts, PREDICT hopes to improve global disease recognition and begin to develop strategies and policy recommendations to minimize pandemic risk.

Speakers and Topics

Jonna Mazet, PREDICT Global Director & Professor, University of California, Davis, USA
Designing a One Health surveillance strategy for emerging diseases: big data, dynamic challenges, and encouraging step-wise successes

Peter Black, ECTAD Deputy Regional Manager, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Bangkok, Thailand
A collaborative framework for advancing pathogen detection at the livestock-wildlife interface

Watthana Theppangna,
An overview of ongoing PREDICT-2 activities in Lao PDR: surveillance on emerging infectious diseases in wildlife and human behaviour study

Sijali Zikankuba,
Bats and Bushmeat: Targeting high risk taxa and behaviours for prevention of viral spillover

Supaporn Wacharapluesadee, Neuroscience Center for Research and Development Laboratory Chief and PREDICT Country Coordinator, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand 
Hospital sentinel surveillance for MERS, ZIka virus, and yet-to-be-detected pathogens through a One Health lens

Aiah Gbakima, Professor and PREDICT Country Coordinator, Metabiota, Inc., Freetown, Sierra Leone
Bringing a One Health approach to Ebola response and prevention in Sierra Leone

 

Symposium 6A - Strengthening Biosecurity Systems

Date: Monday 5th December 2016
Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairpersons: Dr Bruce Christie

Overview

Biosecurity is the protection of the economy, the environment and the community from negative impacts associated with pests, diseases and weeds.  Effective biosecurity demands a multi-disciplinary, multi-agency or ‘One Heath +Eco Health” approach.  

The Biosecurity Symposium will examine and discuss the systems necessary for  effective biosecurity outcomes- from legislation, policy development, early warning surveillance, pest and disease eradication, containment and management,  to diagnostics and effective information management and analysis.  It will discuss the partnerships between government, industry, and the community that are vital for effective biosecurity, and arrangements for sharing decision making and costs through engaging risk creators and beneficiaries.  Contemporary approaches to economic analysis to guide biosecurity investment, including the use of investment portfolio resource allocation tools to maximise return on investment, will be explored.

The symposium will use case studies from Australia but also explore how other countries are approaching these challenges.  The scope will include, but extend beyond, animal and human health, to include invasive species (terrestrial and aquatic) and their impacts on wildlife and the natural environment

Speakers and Topics

Dr Bruce Christie,
Introduction and Overview

Tom Kompas,
Budgeting and Portfolio Allocation for Biosecurity Measures

Harley Smith,
Funding biosecurity activites – a Biosecurity threat Decision Tree

TBA,
Shared Responsibility – the New Zealand experience/ approach

Wantanee Kalpravidh,
Shared Responsibility – an FAO perspective

Arie Freiberg,
Contemporary Legislation – codifying a ‘duty of care’

Panel Discussion,
All Speakers and Chair.

Monday 5th December 2016 1615 – 1800

Symposia 6B - Strengthening Biosecurity Systems

This symposium is a continuation of symposium 7A commencing at 1400

Date: Monday 5th December 2016
Time: 1615 – 1800
Chairpersons: Dr Hugh Millar

Overview

Biosecurity is the protection of the economy, the environment and the community from negative impacts associated with pests, diseases and weeds.  Effective biosecurity demands a multi-disciplinary, multi-agency or ‘One Heath +Eco Health” approach.  

The Biosecurity Symposium will examine and discuss the systems necessary for  effective biosecurity outcomes- from legislation, policy development, early warning surveillance, pest and disease eradication, containment and management,  to diagnostics and effective information management and analysis.  It will discuss the partnerships between government, industry, and the community that are vital for effective biosecurity, and arrangements for sharing decision making and costs through engaging risk creators and beneficiaries.  Contemporary approaches to economic analysis to guide biosecurity investment, including the use of investment portfolio resource allocation tools to maximise return on investment, will be explored.

The symposium will use case studies from Australia but also explore how other countries are approaching these challenges.  The scope will include, but extend beyond, animal and human health, to include invasive species (terrestrial and aquatic) and their impacts on wildlife and the natural environment

Speakers and Topics

Dr Hugh Millar,
Introduction and Overview

Tim Low,
Environmental Surveillance for invasive species – engaging communities and NGOs

Victoria (Tiggy) Grillo,
Wildlife health surveillance – the challenges of early detection and data capture/ management 

TBA
Empowering people in Surveillance Systems (Indonesia)

Jason Blackburn, Mark Fegan,
Redefining the Australian Anthrax belt to better focus surveillance

Lisa Adams 
Thought starter to stimulate Panel Discussion

Panel Discussion
Tim Low, Jerry Leach, Tiggy Grillo, Tanya Howard, Lyn Coulston, Dr Kinzang Dukpa, and Dr Adams.

Symposium 8 - One Health in Action

Date: Monday 5th December 2016
Time: 1615 – 1800
Chairpersons: Joanna McKenzie and Peter Jolly

Overview

There is a great deal of research to support the prospective value of One Health approaches to address emerging infectious diseases. However, the jury is still out on how effective One Health approaches are on the ground in preventing, detecting and responding to pandemic threats.  What challenges are technical specialists facing in applying One Health in different countries?  How are governments implementing multi-sectoral and multi-disciplinary activities? What are governments and the private sector doing to make the success of their approaches more sustainable?

The Preparedness & Response (P&R) project, part of the USAID suite of projects under the Emerging Pandemic Threats program, will host a symposium at the 4th International One Health Congress and 6th Biennial Congress of the International Association for Ecology and Health. This 90-minute symposium will provide real world examples of successes in institutionalizing the One Health approach, as well as the remaining challenges facing governments, donors and implementing partners.  The symposium will feature presentations from officials from three countries in Southeast Asia, Central and East Africa and West Africa. The presentations will be followed by a panel of leading One Health experts, moderated by P&R project director Jerry Martin.  A significant amount of time will be reserved for questions from the audience.

Speakers and Topics

Joanna McKenzie,
Converting One Health Principles into Practical Action.

Sithar Dorjee,
Achieving Effective National and Regional Involvement in the Application of a One Health Strategy for Zoonotic Disease.

Kinley Penjor,
A Template for Development of One Health National Control Policies for High Priority Zoonotic Diseases in Bhutan.

Sultan Mahmood,
Experience of Incorporating Collaborative Field Epidemiological Studies into a One Health Policy Development Process for Zoonotic Diseases in Bangladesh.

Manisha Bista,
A One Health Approach to Developing National Workforce Capability and Capacity for Responding to Emerging Infectious Diseases, and its Application in South Africa.

Peter Jolly,
Converting One Health Principles into Practical Action: Lessons Learned in South Asia.

Tuesday 6th December 1400 – 1545

Symposium 8 - GOARN - Responding to outbreaks, WHO, FAO, OIE

Date: Tuesday 6th December 2016
Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairperson: Mr Tony Stewart

Overview

A brief overview will be available soon.

Tuesday 6th December 1610 – 1800

Symposium 9 - Attention to the 'Bottom Billion', their animals and shared environment

Date: Tuesday 6th December 2016

Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairpersons: Bernadette Abela- Ridder

Overview

More information coming soon

Speakers and Topics

Bernadetta Abela-Ridder,
Attention to the ‘bottom billion’, their animals and shared environment

Dr Johannes Sommerfield,
One Health Attention to the ‘Bottom Billion’, their Animals and Shared Environments.

Alison Macintyre,
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for health and development. A focus on joint action to tackle Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs).

Marshall Lightowlers,
New Strategies for Controlling Cystic Echinococcosis and Taenia solium.

Abdulrazaq Habib,
Poor access to care among snakebite impoverished victims and their animals

Kevin Le Roux,
Expanding Disease control in South Africa through the rabies One Health Model.

Lenore Manderson,
Zoonotic disease, biodiversity and the community.

Symposium 10 - One Health in Action: What's working and why

Date: Tuesday 6th December 2016

Time: 1400 – 1545
Chairpersons: Jerry Martin (DIA for USAID)

 

Speakers and Topics

Preparedness for responding to emerging diseases
Introduction (5 Minutes) Jerry Martin, P&R Project Director

One Health Implementation Examples (Suggested, 50 minutes)

Liberia: Starting from the Beginning (10 minutes)
Presenter TBD

Kenya: Making Success Sustainable (10 minutes)

Dr. Kariuki Ndjenga, Chief Medical Officer, Kenya Medical Research Institute

Bangladesh: Building an OH Structure (10 minutes)
Dr. Nitish Debnath, National One Health coordinator, FAO-ECTAD

Q&A session (20 minutes)

Panel Discussion: What Can We Learn? (30 minutes)

Discussion on presentations, including takeaways and responses to audience questions
Moderator: Jerry Martin, P&R Project Director

Panelists:
Dr. Jonathan Rushton, Senior Lecturer, Veterinary Epidemiology, Economics and Public Health Group at the Royal Veterinary College, London

Dr. Lertrak Srikitjakarn, Chiangmai University Veterinary school, Thailand; President, Thailand One Health University Network

Symposium 11 - Social Dimensions of supporting health systems to protect against emerging infectious disease

Date: Tuesday 6th December 2016
Time: 1610 – 1800
Chairpersons: Helen Ross (University of Queensland) and Prof Mark Rweyemamu (Southern Africa Centre for Infectious Diseases)

Overview

The interactions between human, animal and ecosystem health that are inherent in One Health and EcoHealth involve human values, thinking, culture and behaviour, as individuals, and in multi-level systems from local to global. Understanding the social dimensions underlying emerging infectious diseases is therefore fundamental, yet it is underplayed within the body of research available. On balance probably the traditional EcoHealth community has tended to value the social dimension more prominently than the traditional One Health community. Nevertheless, there is an increasing realisation of the important role for social sciences in the One Health/EcoHealth programs, especially in developing countries. This session explores a variety of important social dimensions, management strategies, within a systems thinking approach.

Speakers

  • Prof Barbara McPake (Nossal Institute) – Social dimensions of supporting health systems to protect against emerging infectious disease
  • Dr Anne Poelina (Madjulla Inc) – Cultural issues in land care, sustainable agriculture and food security.
  • Prof Anthony Capon (United Nations University) – System thinking to improve understanding of, and responses to, emerging health challenges. 
  • Dr Catherine Robinson (CSIRO) – Building a collaborative total health system approach to biosecurity surveillance

Hosts

CSIRO

Deakin

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Key Dates

Registration Open:
Now Open
Author Registration Deadline:
26 August 2016
Early Bird Registration Deadline:
26 August 2016
Late Breaking Author Registration Deadline:
1 November 2016
Congress Dates:
3 – 7 December 2016

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